The Forgotten War- Korean War



Teacher Name: Darryl Carr Grade Level(s): 9-12 Course: Social Studies

Anticipatory Lesson:


412879304_o[1]_(2).jpg "God Please Protect America" by Jimmie Osborne


412879304_o[1]_(2).jpg "There's Peace in Korea" by Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Type of classroom activity to be performed:
This lesson will be a cooperative learning activity using primary sources, maps, technology, and will address cross-curricular studies with a writing and multi-media assignment.
Rationale:
This lesson will introduce students to the conflict by having them read the most important administration documents related to it. Specifically it will address four major issues: 1) Truman's decision to send troops to Korea; 2) The decision to cross the 38th Parallel into North Korea, at the risk of a wider war with China; 3) Truman's decision to fire MacArthur; and 4) the war's growing unpopularity in the United States

Required time frame: 5-6 regular class periods.
Lesson Objectives—the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge in reference:
  • Explain why the United States became involved in the war in Korea
  • Assess the decision to send U.S. and U.N. forces across the 38th Parallel into North Korea
  • Discuss the conflict between Truman and MacArthur, culminating in the latter's dismissal from command
  • Articulate the reasons why the war became unpopular in the United States
  • Identify on a world map foreign countries associated with the Korean War
  • Identify key terms and individuals associated with the Korean War
  • Veterans of the Korean War deserve recognition for their service.
  • First-person accounts of the Korean War make the long-ago and almost forgotten war come alive.
Secondary Materials:
  • Korea: The First War We Lost –Bevin Alexander
  • Korean War timeline handout
  • The Korean War 1950-1953 Map
  • Interview handout sheet
  • Blank map of East Asia

Primary Sources:
· Korean War Project:
http://www.koreanwar.org/

"I shall go to Korea"
General Douglas MacArthur Defends His Conduct in the War in Korea, April 19, 1951:
"IPublic opinion on Korean War
· Order from President Truman, December 20, 1950:
htt Memorandum from George Kennan to Secretary of State Dean Acheson, August 23, 1950:
Telegram, dated June 24, 1950, from U.S. State Department to President Harry S. Truman regarding reports of North Korean forces invading the Republic of Korea:
radio.jpg March 4, 1953: MASH 8055 Interview: A reporter interviews medical technicians at a U.N. advanced surgical hospital on the 38th parallel in Korea. This MASH unit was the inspiration for the film and subsequent television series "M*A*S*H."

Technology Required:
· Internet access

Fully describe the activity or assignment in detail. What will both you and the students do?
This assignment is divided into five activities.
Activity 1 will discuss Public opinion on Korean War The students will view the web link “Public Opinion on the Korean War,” divide students into groups and discuss the clip. to write a brief essay in response to the following question: "What did the American public think about the war by late 1952—early 1953? What factors do you think influenced their opinions?"
Activity 2 will focus on the conflict between President Truman and General MacArthur. Students will listen to the taped recording of Truman firing MacArthur. Students will view and respond to General Douglas MacArthur Defends His Conduct in the War in Korea, April 19, 1951. Have the class simulate a congressional hearing to determine whether Truman's decision to fire MacArthur was justified. Select two students from the class, one to portray Truman and the other MacArthur.
Activity 3 will follow the decision of the US to cross the 38th Parallel; students will watch Memorandum from George Kennan to Secretary of State Dean Acheson, August 23, 1950. In this activity, students will read documents pertaining to the decision to cross the 38th Parallel and enter North Korea; i.e., the decision to change the object of war from the defense of South Korea to the punishment of North Korea. First, in small groups, students will make a list of “pros” and “cons” for crossing the 38th Parallel. As a large group, students will present their list to the class. To conclude, hold an in-class discussion, asking the students what they would do in this situation if they were president. They should be cautioned to think in terms of the world of the 1950s, rather than today's world. Afterward, explain to them that Truman ultimately decided to authorize MacArthur to cross the 38th Parallel and invade North Korea.
Activity 4 will explore the decision to intervene in Korean. Students will view Telegram, dated June 24, 1950, from U.S. State Department to President Harry S. Truman regarding reports of North Korean forces invading the Republic of Korea. Building upon what they have learned, in class about the origins and outbreak of the Korean War, students should then be instructed to write as homework a three-paragraph letter to the editor in which they defend Truman's decision to commit U.S. forces to the defense of South Korea. Each paragraph should consist of a general statement as well as at least two facts, drawn from the documents, to back up that statement.
Activity 5 students will interview a Korean War veteran asking specific guided questions about their experience in the war. Students will be given instructions on how to conduct an in-person interview, additionally, giving a handout to follow.
Assessment:
After completing this lesson, students should be able to write brief (3-4 paragraphs) essays answering the following question: Did the war in Korea represent a triumph or a failure of American foreign policy? Students are to include with supporting examples from reading, websites and class discussion.
Students should be able to identify and explain the significance of the following:
  • Douglas MacArthur
  • Inchon
  • 38th Parallel
  • Wake Island Conference
On a blank map of Southeast Asia, students should be able to identify the following locations:
  • North Korea
  • South Korea
  • China
  • Taiwan
Student working in groups of no more than three will submit a 1-page summary of the interview of a Korean War veteran.